fiduciary

Author Topic: The Basics Of Thread Tapping  (Read 33669 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Aluke123

  • Master Force User
  • *****
  • Posts: 3680
The Basics Of Thread Tapping
« on: January 08, 2008, 09:56:45 PM »
First off, the tools.

Required: A thread tap (and the drill bit that comes with one). These come in many different thread pitches. Ultra uses 8-32 threading for his blade retention screws. If you strip out that screw, go to 10-32 thread pitch.

This is a picture of a tap and the drill bit it uses.



Some kind of power drill. A drill press is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED, because with hand drill, you risk the bit wandering.

Optional, but HIGHLY recommended: Tap handle. The tap handle holds the tap, like the chuck on a drill holds the bit. The handle allows you to keep the tap at 90 degrees, and gives you plenty of torque. You can tap without the handle, by using pliers to hold the tap. This isn't recommended though, and come on, the handle is all of 6 bucks. DO NOT USE A DRILL PRESS FOR THE TAPPING. YOU WILL DESTROY YOUR TAP.



The Idiot Proof Steps To Tapping

1) Secure the drill bit that comes into your drill. A drill press is HIGHLY recommended.

2) Secure the work piece. A drill press vice is HIGHLY recommended.

3) Drill the hole. Make sure you drill at the peak of the hilt's curve, otherwise, you will have a crooked hole.


4) Clean out the hole, make sure that no metal scraps are still in the hole.
5) Attach the tap to tap handle. DO NOT USE DRILL PRESS INSTEAD OF A TAP HANDLE. YOU WILL DESTROY YOUR TAP AND HOLE.
6) Begin tapping the hole. You want to turn the tap handle 1/4 to 1/2 a rotation, and then back it out to remove material. Using lubrication during this step is highly recommended. DO NOT just tap the entire hole without backing out the tap. You run the risk of breaking that tap, and even if you don't, you will have a very poorly threaded hole.

7) Run the tap through the hole one last time, just to make sure it is threaded well. Clean out any metal shavings still in the hole. A can of compressed air works well here.

8 ) Thread your screw into the hole. Make sure you have the same thread pitch screw as hole. Otherwise, it won't work.
9) Enjoy your beautifully threaded hole  :)

Here is a good drill bit-tap reference chart.

8-32 is M4x0.7.
6-32 is M3.5 x .06.
10-32 (I'm assuming that's "UNF") is M5 x .08.
4-40 is M3 x .05.

Here's a complete chart.

Another formula is: to find the right size drill bit for the tap subtract the thread pitch from the screw size. Example: M5 screw with a .7 thread pitch would require a 4.3 drill bit.


Anyone who has suggestions (or things I forgot), post em up, and I will add them to the original post.
Anyone who has questions, post them, and we will try and help you out.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2009, 11:39:15 AM by Aluke123 »

Lord Maul on TCSS

Offline Luke S.

  • under review
  • Master Force User
  • *
  • Posts: 10718
  • Romans 3:20-26 As simple as it gets.
Re: The Basics Of Thread Tapping
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2008, 09:59:53 PM »
Nicely done Aluke.  I think DT is working on a padawan training center and this should be added to it.

I have stickied it until we get a group tutorial.

Offline Aluke123

  • Master Force User
  • *****
  • Posts: 3680
Re: The Basics Of Thread Tapping
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2008, 10:00:54 PM »
Thanks TK for the sticky. Now we just hope and pray that people read it  ;D

Lord Maul on TCSS

Offline Luke S.

  • under review
  • Master Force User
  • *
  • Posts: 10718
  • Romans 3:20-26 As simple as it gets.
Re: The Basics Of Thread Tapping
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2008, 10:05:36 PM »
I hear ya.  You can lead a horse to water.........

I only have one thought and that is the drill press mention.  At first glance I thought someone may try to use the tap in a drill press.  An inexperienced person would be clueless there.  And anyone with a drill press should know better but if someone were to have access to one ther might be some confusion.  Other than that is looks great.  I just explained this about an hour ago to a new member.

Offline Aluke123

  • Master Force User
  • *****
  • Posts: 3680
Re: The Basics Of Thread Tapping
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2008, 10:08:38 PM »
Okies, the drill press idea is added. I would of never thought of that one  :P

Lord Maul on TCSS

Offline Luke S.

  • under review
  • Master Force User
  • *
  • Posts: 10718
  • Romans 3:20-26 As simple as it gets.
Re: The Basics Of Thread Tapping
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2008, 10:10:10 PM »
Looks good.  I think it is pretty well idiot proofed.  Now we wait for an idiot. lol  ;D

Offline lowandheavy

  • Experienced Force User
  • ****
  • Posts: 451
Re: The Basics Of Thread Tapping
« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2008, 03:15:53 AM »
Thanks this was pretty informative Aluke, I will more than likely be tapping my blade holder this week and this was the best time for this! Thanks!

Seth Ski-Woo

  • Guest
Re: The Basics Of Thread Tapping
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2008, 06:33:23 AM »
Great job Aluke, your time put into doing this is really helpful and appreciated.  ;)

I've noticed with tap sets that there are sometimes three types of taps, like a tapered (starting?) one and a couple of others.

Are these relevant to sabers or are they maybe for deeper holes for other stuff or something?

Offline Luke S.

  • under review
  • Master Force User
  • *
  • Posts: 10718
  • Romans 3:20-26 As simple as it gets.
Re: The Basics Of Thread Tapping
« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2008, 06:43:44 AM »
Aluke I added a sizing chart for reference.  This should help as well.

Offline Atomic

  • No Force
  • *
  • Posts: 44
    • MERC
Re: The Basics Of Thread Tapping
« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2008, 09:11:46 AM »
Something I did that helped me, was practicing.

First I started on a scrap piece of PVC tube. It's softer and much easier to work with, but it got me into how things should feel. I've also found that on metal without a drill press, that it's very easy for the bit to wander, even if I used a punch (or nail) to make a starter area. I used a smaller bit and drilled a much smaller hole, and used that for my guide for my drill size that I would later tap.

It can't be said enough, slow and steady wins the race here.
----------
Atomic

Offline Sidneyious

  • Alias......Ninja of the Mist
  • Master Force User
  • *****
  • Posts: 3802
    • Blog of my saber builds.
Re: The Basics Of Thread Tapping
« Reply #10 on: February 18, 2008, 10:23:26 AM »
The only time I ever had a bit walk on me was cause there wasent a center punch mark.

Even a nail will work as a center punch.

Offline Aluke123

  • Master Force User
  • *****
  • Posts: 3680
Re: The Basics Of Thread Tapping
« Reply #11 on: February 18, 2008, 10:47:49 AM »
I haven't ever used a center punch. What I do is take the smallest drill bit I have (forget size offhand), and drill a tiny pilot hole. I've never had a bit wander from that.

Lord Maul on TCSS

Offline Sidneyious

  • Alias......Ninja of the Mist
  • Master Force User
  • *****
  • Posts: 3802
    • Blog of my saber builds.
Re: The Basics Of Thread Tapping
« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2008, 10:50:19 AM »
Yeah but the center punch  keeps even the smallest of bits from walking

Offline Aluke123

  • Master Force User
  • *****
  • Posts: 3680
Re: The Basics Of Thread Tapping
« Reply #13 on: February 18, 2008, 10:55:37 AM »
Here is a trick to eliminate walking with tiny bendable bits.

Slide the bit into the chuck* until only about 1/2" is showing. If you have more than that, the bit can walk.

*The part on a drill that holds the drill bit

Lord Maul on TCSS

Offline Matt Thorn

  • Experienced Force User
  • ****
  • Posts: 342
    • Köjin Köbö
Re: The Basics Of Thread Tapping
« Reply #14 on: March 03, 2008, 06:10:42 PM »
Hi. Matt Thorn here, trying out for the role of "the better idiot." I've bought my Ultrasabers Darth Maul DIY kit, and am looking at with trepidation, palms sweating. I don't have a drill press. (I wouldn't use it enough to justify the cost, and don't have room for it in my little Japanese apartment.) But all the advice on how to drill a straight, clean hole without one will, I'm sure, come in handy. (Knock on wood.) My problem is that I live in Japan, and wouldn't even know what this kind of tap would be called in Japanese. (Even in English, the word has a multitude of meanings, though obviously a hardware store attendant would understand "I'm looking for a tap for threading a hole.") I'll do what I can about the language problem (just printing out the above photo would no doubt help), but I want to confirm the size. I'm not 100% certain I understand the chart, so I'd like to confirm. Since it's an Ultrsaber kit (which says I need an 8/32 tap), I'm assuming this is what I want:

8-32 29  M5 x 0.8 4.20

Now, it's hard to tell from the chart precisely what stands for what, so bear with the better idiot here, please. "8-32" is the size of the tap. "29" is the size of the bit in inches. Right so far? Now here's the crucial part. Is "M5 x 0.8" the size of the tap in metric? Does the "M" just mean "Metric"? Is "4.20" the size of the drill bit? If so, does it literally mean "4.2 millimeters"? I looked in the local home improvement center (much, much smaller than a Home Depot) and couldn't find anything that resembled a tap for threading, so I think I'm going to have to go to a serious hardware store, and I have some place in mind (though it's a 30 minute bike ride from home). I'm pretty sure I can find everything I need at that hardware store, but I want to make sure I'm asking the right questions. Obviously, I'll take the screw with me, and maybe the hilt of the saber, to make sure they understand what I'm trying to do.

Now I've just got to find out how to say these things in Japanese. (I've been speaking the language for 20 years, but this is the first time I've ever had to use such terms.  ;D)
There's always a bigger fish.